Sinclair Watercolor Finished

Finished Watercolor

Finished Watercolor

When we delight in a thing in nature all our accounting of its environment is selective.  

Robert Henri, The Art Spirit

My schedule today opened a 2 1/2 hour hole in my teaching rhythm (conference period and lunch combined).  I decided to see what I could do with this painting during that gap, and to my surprise, finished it.  I finally got around to deciding how to render the surface of the rooftop, re-worked the foliage all around, detailed the power lines, pebbled the foreground some more, and established a horizon (finally).  Following the thread of Henri’s quote above, I’ll say that my “selected” interest in this entire painting was the lit-up background, and the attempt to put some kind of “heat” into the compositioin to offset all the cool shades of green between the Sinclair station and the pickup truck.  I tried to balance the complementary greens and reds, along with complementary yellows and violets.  The shades of violet are not apparent, but I mixed Winsor Violet into so many of these colors that I’m surpirsed to see it blending into the picture instead of sticking out as some kind of brazen purple.

What’s next?  I have no clue.  But I have an entire weekend to cotemplate my next adventure, and I’m really happy to set this painting aside.  I’m ready for the next task.

Thanks for reading.

I paint in order to remember.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself that I am never alone.

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23 Responses to “Sinclair Watercolor Finished”

  1. Sandra L Page Says:

    Love the painting and coincidentally, my grandfather, whose name was Frank Tripp, had a Humble Station in Westworth Village on White Settlement Rd. In the early days it was a wooden grocery store and gas station. In the mid to late fifties, he moved the old store off the lot and built a “modern” concrete block building. The name of the gas changed over the years, but he always had the pumps and the groceries. That store is still there and owned by people I don’t know. The old house behind it appears to have been condemned.

    Like

    • davidtripp Says:

      Thank you so much for writing that, Sandra. I would like to drive oer to Westworth Village and see what is left of that property. I appreciate so much the memories you shared.

      Like

  2. Xraypics Says:

    Yes! it looks great. Well done, I think you have balanced that heat, light and shadow superbly. I’ve the opposite experience of time; at work yesterday discovered I must step in for a colleague – lecture on Endocrinology in Radiology with nothing prepared! Shamelessly downloaded a lecture from the net, re-wrote it, slashed 50% added pictures, jokes, and two extra categories – took nearly 8 hours – but have something just presentable for this afternoon. All in what I hoped might be a free day to do something creative. C’est la vie! Tony

    Like

    • davidtripp Says:

      Wow, how on earth did you accomplish that? I feel sorry enough for myself when I spend a day in the high school teaching English, Art History (on two levels) and Philosophy, then driving across town to teach Logic or World Religions at the the University. Sometimes I feel like a pediatrician walking into an examination room, wondering if he has the right symptoms matched to the proper patient.

      Like

  3. Deanna Tennent Masterson Says:

    Brilliant…it’s a 10!

    Like

  4. Duncan Says:

    Fantastic work as always! I’m anxious for the next adventure.

    Like

  5. lesliepaints Says:

    This is wonderful and has caught my eye as you were painting it, David. I had an Uncle who worked at a Sinclair station in Wilmette, Illinois, when I was little. I had a huge blowup “Dino”, too! Thanks for the memory. Beautiful painting.

    Like

  6. coreyaber Says:

    Nicely done David. I like how you captured the little bit of red on the roof showing up despite the bright sun. There’s always something to learn from in your paintings.

    Like

    • davidtripp Says:

      Thank you, Corey. I’m very much inspired by your consistent output and drawing plenty of inspiration from you. Let’s keep pushing one another!

      Like

      • coreyaber Says:

        Thanks to you I recently got into Proust. Reading him, and thinking about how my own kids must see and value things, got me thinking back to your doorknob and screen door paintings. They were all painted from an adult’s viewpoint, correct? I think the doorknobs, rendered in the same dry brushed and vignetted manner would be especially interesting from the childhood viewing angle. The same may be true for some of your other still life objects. Just a thought. Those paintings also got me thinking about another project to pursue, which I will post about on my blog, though not for some time still. Looking forward to your next painting, as your posts help keep me motivated.

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      • davidtripp Says:

        Hearing from you is always a tonic for me, Corey, thank you. I plan to return to still life when the cold winter drives me back into my Man Cave. I’ll seriously consider that low-angle child perspective on a series of doorknobs. Thanks for that idea. I’m finally back into the studio on a Friday night. I hate working under house lights, but the school schedule prohibits me from using the daylight. I hope things are still inspiring on your end of the world.

        Like

      • coreyaber Says:

        After I wrote to you it occurred to me that in my own memories, I don’t think the physical point of view is from whatever size I was at the time of the remembered event. Rather, I often see the event from the outside from the height I am today. And, all the people kinda look like they do today. That didn’t seem strange until my suggestion to you, because then I wondered if that low angle would be somehow artificial. I am curious how it works for you.

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      • davidtripp Says:

        Good observation. I certainly color my remembrances with an adult filter. Nevertheless, I have given plenty of thought lately to changing my perspective angles on certain subjects. I hope to get after this soon. As for now, the festival season is fast approaching, and I’ll be fortunate to generate art at all as these events bury me.

        Like

  7. lifeofawillow Says:

    I like traveling along with you. Always something new to see…

    Like

  8. Ruth Flynn Says:

    I look forward to meeting you at the Genny Wood art show

    Like

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