Back to Work on Monday, with Hemingway on my Mind

Beginning of a Small Studio Painting of a Caboose in Waxahachie, Texas

Beginning of a Small Studio Painting of a Caboose in Waxahachie, Texas

Meantime he was working harder than he had ever worked in his life, often until three or four in the morning.  Then he would fall asleep, his head feeling like a frozen cabbage, only to jump awake again a few hours later, with the words already stringing themselves into sentences, clamoring to be set down.

Ernest Hemingway: A Life Story, by Carlos Baker

A part of me cautions that I am supposed to be slowing down.  It’s summer time.  My summer school only demands four mornings a week.  But I cannot seem to find a lower gear.  Last week I was continually stimulated by the AVID Summer Institute I attended in Dallas.  Following AVID I was rocked by a pair of exhibitions at the Dallas Museum of Art.  All weekend I had the stirrings of art and literature continually competing for my attention.  And then, this morning we began our study of Shakespeare’s Macbeth.  Now I have Shakespeare, Hemingway, and this watercolor all wanting a piece of me, and as I worked this afternoon in the studio, I played a documentary of Cezanne on the television and could not ignore the ideas emerging from that.  I just cannot seem to “stop the machine” as they cried in Kerouac’s On the Road.  

But I like living this way.  I like being stirred up by ideas.  And I’m enjoying this studio attempt at a watercolor I did en plein air several weeks ago.  A watercolorist friend whom I highly trust gave me a plethora of ideas concerning light, shadow and composition that I want to apply to this piece.  The size is 9 x 12″ and if I get what I want from the experience, I’ll probably try it yet again in a larger format.

Thanks for reading.

I paint in order to remember.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself that I am not alone.

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9 Responses to “Back to Work on Monday, with Hemingway on my Mind”

  1. sedge808 Says:

    frozen cabbage, 🙂

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  2. LucyJartz Says:

    The ruled lines in the sketch show planning. The clouds and foliage add good structural contrast. I learned something from this painting’s early stage. Thank you.

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    • davidtripp Says:

      Thank you for saying that. I’m always glad to pick up something from studying someone else’s art. It thrills me to know I can offer that onece in awhile.

      Like

      • LucyJartz Says:

        After meeting you last year and following your blog, I have learned a lot from your methods. How many times I have asked “how did he get it to look like that” and studied your sketches and painting. Alas, I am years behind! 🙂

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      • davidtripp Says:

        You are far too kind! Your artwork is far more diverse than mine will ever be. I love the breadth of your creative interests (and I still cannot get a handle on flowers in watercolor!). Thank you for your encouragement. Sorry you could not do Waxahachie this year. The exhibition (held in a different venue) was a bust, and I hope they will improve traffic and sales next year. I always participate, but this year’s event yielded the lowest return in my perrsonal history.

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      • LucyJartz Says:

        I am sorry it was a dissapointing show, although I am sure you enjoyed socializing with the other artists again. Last year I met other artists who encouraged me and helped make up for the discomfort of floudering in my first show.

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      • davidtripp Says:

        You did not flounder! I just looked at last year’s work again on your blog. You have a very artistic and sensitive touch with watercolor, and plein air is extremely challenging. I hope you will continue to explore it. I divide my time pretty equally between studio and on-site work (and my on-site work never looks as good as studio, though there is something to be said about the freshness of plein air sketches). Thanks for talking with me.

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      • LucyJartz Says:

        Thank you. I value your feedback. 🙂

        Like

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