Finishing a Small Snowscape

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Recent View of Fresh-fallen Snow in High Ridge, Missouri

Wyeth had of course pleased everyone but himself. His apprenticeship now appeared to him shallow and degrading. the Pyle School had been nothing more than a factory where successful pictorial journalists had been–his word–manufactured. He and the others had been “whipped into line,” taught artificial shortcuts, trained to think as the audience thinks, not for themselves as artists.

David Michaelis, N. C. Wyeth: A Biography

After more than 200 pages of reading, I am finding it very difficult to put down this volume on N. C. Wyeth. His son Andrew has been my patron saint since high school, but in the past year I have been studying more about N. C., and love his fixation on the writings of Emerson and Thoreau. Now, reading of his training as an illustrator, and his subsequent struggle to navigate his way between the identities of illustrator and painter, I am finding so much to think about as I find my own way as an artist.

This morning I finished the painting I started of the view across my sister’s backyard. The snow was falling heavily that day a couple of weeks ago, and I used a toothbrush to spatter masquing fluid all over the page before commencing the actual painting. The ony part I found most difficult (and rewarding) was the attempt to draw the houses and rooftops peeking through the winter trees. It has been awhile since I studied and sketched winter tree anatomy, and I have missed the experience. I have a second snow scene nearly finished as well, and hope to be  posting that one soon.

Between reading, painting, and preparing materials for my pair of workshops this coming Saturday, there has been little down time. Still, I love the life I’m able to pursue, balancing my reading with my studio art endeavors. I hope I can continue to find room and space for both in my daily life.

Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to remember.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.

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4 Responses to “Finishing a Small Snowscape”

  1. Dian Darr Says:

    Seeing his illustrations from all the children’s classics was something I will never forget. When he illustrated all of the books, the publisher owned the art. We talked to people at the Wyeth museum in Brandywine who told us of a foundation that has devoted years to buying these incredible illustrations for the museum. The publisher gave many of them away. I loved these books and seeing his paintings fromfrom Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and Robinson Crusoe was a thrill!

    Like

    • davidtripp Says:

      Dian, thank you. I haven’t been to Brandywine since about 1995. I really want to go back there. I am really getting deeply ensconced in N. C.’s legacy. An amazing human being!

      Like

  2. doubledacres Says:

    Nice job my friend.

    Like

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