Posts Tagged ‘daffodil cottage’

Continued Experimenting at the Eureka Springs School of the Arts

June 20, 2012

Experiment in Poured Watercolor

Students this year have expressed an interest in pouring techniques, so I developed this experiment over a three-day period, by masking, pouring Transparent Yellow, then Winsor Blue (Green Shade), masking some more on day two, then pouring Winsor Violet and Phthalo Turquoise.  After all of it was dry, I used my “ugly brush” to render foliage textures, using mostly Dr. Ph Martins liquid watercolors (Sap Green with touches of Transparent Yellow and Ultramarine Blue).  After removing all the masking, I worked in some tree branches, using an X-acto knife and Albrecht Durer brand watercolor pencil in Dark Sepia.  Plenty of salting and spritzing occurred throughout the two-day experiment as well.  I think I’ve done about all I can with it, so I now post it and let you have a look.

Daffodil Cottage in the Waning Light

Three of my students this year are residing within a block or two of where I am.   Last night, they invited anyone interested to “congregate” at the Piedmont House, where they were staying.  Seven of us gathered in the waning light, and gave plein air our best shot.  I thought I was choosing well by going to the second floor deck and looking down the street at the Daffodil Cottage and adjoining property.  What I hadn’t counted on was the low ceiling blocking out the light from my easel, and the longer I worked, the less I could discern between the reds and the greens on my watercolor block!  So, I threw in the towel.  I have posted what I attempted.  Nevertheless, I must say this–when a fisherman casts about all day, and never gets as much as a strike, and tells me that it was still a beautiful day to be out, I don’t trust him.  When a golfer shoots considerably higher than his comfort-zone-score, and says that nevertheless he had an enjoyable time golfing, I suspect he is lying.  I can say for myself, without hedging, that every plein air attempt brings me joy, even when I make a bad painting.   I already have more-than-enough paintings in my inventory; it doesn’t matter that the present one isn’t worthy.  I always enjoy plein air, and really believe that I have learned at least one thing from engaging in that effort.  And last night, I enjoyed immensely.

After I descended the stairs, I found everyone else still painting, still engaged, and still happy.  And I took genuine delight in that.  Afterward, we sat around awhile longer talking, laughing, listening to the sounds of a tourist town winding down for the evening.  I have no regrets from last night.

Thanks for reading.