Posts Tagged ‘David Tripp’

Finishing a Quick Study

August 28, 2021

Why do we seek climates warmed by another sun? Who is the man that by fleeing from his country, can also flee from himself?

Horace, Ode, ii. 16. 18

One telling Socrates, that such a one was nothing improved by his travels: “I very well believe it,” said he, “for he took himself along with him.”

Montaigne, “Of Solitude”

Reading Montaigne on this early Saturday morning has proved to be a great beginning to a day in the gallery/studio. I am happy to find myself in good company when in solitude, but I also confess that the company will improve greatly once Sandi enters the gallery!

My plan is to finish this 8 x 10″ watercolor today and frame it for the Gallery. We will head back home tonight, but I’m delighted to have begun & completed a painting in the short time we were here.

Back to work! Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to discover.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.

Hygge

January 3, 2021

Uh…what? Hy-gge. Pronounced hue-gə, which sounds a bit French, this mysterious noun,
adjective and verb resembles not only a typically Danish attitude, but also wellbeing, comfort and feeling at home.

Meik Wiking

What a wonderful start to this New Year! Sandi and I came out to Lubbock just as the winter weather turned frigid, making it difficult for her to spend quality time with her horse. Now the afternoons are sunny, pushing temps up to the fifties and sixties, so she is able to ride. And I am finding life serene in this hotel room with a pair of loving dogs, my art supplies and a fine collection of reading material.

Holiday gifts have continued to accumulate, now including warm greetings and conversations online with a host of friends whom I cannot visit during this wretched COVID era. Someone yesterday alerted me to a book by Meik Wiking, The Little Book of Hygge: Danish Secrets to Happy Living. I have ordered it already on Amazon. Meanwhile, I am reading everything I can pull up online from the pen of this Meik Wiking.

The Danish word hygge reminds me in many ways of the Greek notion of eudaimonia. Both point toward a general spirit of well-being, though hygge sounds to me that it is more oriented to the environment, the stage we set for quality mindfulness. In my case, the word seems to point to my own Studio Eidolons at home, or The Gallery at Redlands in Palestine, or the old general store I enjoy inhabiting in east Texas. My initial perceptions of hygge may be inaccurate; I’ll know more once I receive the book and give it a thoughtful read.

Meanwhile, this Sunday morning has been sublime. I stripped off the masquing from the watercolor I started yesterday. It appears I have a decent foundation for this next painting. I have yet to get out my supplies as I’ve decided instead to look over the composition and make some plans for its development. Taking out my draft of New Year’s Resolutions, I’ve decided to make some adjustments to the way I pursue my studio work this year. Having purchased for the first time a watercolor sketchbook last September, I’ve decided to put it to work as I study these snowy evergreens. Alongside the 8 x 10″ watercolor I’ll experiment with some color sketches. I’ve also decided to be more faithful in recording observational notes in the sketchbook, recording the colors and techniques employed. I brought with me on this trip a selection of watercolor pencils to layer with my tube watercolors. I also have some smaller rigger brushes. I’m in the mood for some experimenting.

I am resolved this year to pursue more Quality in day-to-day life. I have not tuned in to local or national news this day, because I suspect that venom is still coursing through the public discourse. To all my readers, I wish you success in creating more hygge in your day-to-day experiences. Hopefully, in addition to adding more color to your own life, you will play a hand in coloring your surroundings.

Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to discover.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.

Painting and Remembering

March 20, 2016

Winfield

An artist paints so that he will have something to look at; at times he must write so that he will also have something to read.

Barnett Newman

I laughed out loud this morning when I read some of the wit of Barnett Newman. In response, I spent a good part of this day painting so I could have something to look at, and writing in my journal so I would have something to read.

On a more serious note, it feels great to be painting again, the workshop last week really got my juices flowing, and the bad weather threatening Corpus Christi gave me the space to return home and pick up the brush again. I am currently trying to figure out how to close out these two Missouri scenes, the one above from Winfield, where I photographed a store front back in 2010 or 2009. The one below came from a section of Highway 30 west of High Ridge that I photographed in the rain last Thanksgiving as I was beginning my return to Texas.

High Ridge

Good Thoughts Stretching into the Night

March 10, 2016

One Man Show Art Center Poster

Ὁ βίος βραχύς,ἡ δὲ τέχνη μακρή,ὁ δὲ καιρὸς ὀξύς,ἡ δὲ πεῖρα σφαλερή,ἡ δὲ κρίσις χαλεπή.

Life is short, and art long, opportunity fleeting, experience perilous, and decision difficult.

Hippocrates

As my age creeps closer to 62, I find these late-night sessions preparing Advanced Placement Art History classes to be filled with clashing sentiments of a weary body and an exhilarated mind.  Yes, I feel cranky over the loss of sleep, but the ocean of art in which I find myself treading water fills my imagination with childlike wonder.

Late tonight, I finished my last A. P. Art History class before Spring Break and that comes with a splendid feeling of accomplishment.  Above, I’ve posted am image of the poster that the Art Center in Corpus Christi has placed in the midst of my show that opened last week. I’m counting the days till I get to meet interested people at the Artist’s Reception March 16 from 5-7:00. Below I’m going to post a few photos of the thirty-four paintings I’ve placed in the show.

Thanks for reading, and perhaps I’ll have the time and space to post more thoughts tomorrow.

Across the View $550

Across the View

Firewheel Frenzy $450

Firewheel Frenzy

Following the Labyrinthe $750

Following the Labyrinthe

Drybrush Ruminations $525

Drybrush Ruminations

Homer's Wine-Dark Sea $400

Homer’s Wine-Dark Sea

Shell Collaboration $470

Shell Collaboration