Posts Tagged ‘fox hunt’

Fox Hunt now on the Greeting Card, March 7, 2010

March 7, 2010

Jennifer in the Hunt

Signed-and-numbered limited edition giclees are being made from this image.  I’m hoping they will be ready in time for Thursday’s Art Festival in Hillsboro.  I’ve just finished preparing the 5 x 7″ greeting card, blank inside, with the following caption on back:  Here is my first attempt at painting a fox hunt with hounds.  Jennifer Stewart (the artist who designs my website) submitted to me a magnificent photo made by her husband Bart.  This painting is also my first “poured” painting, where I poured the watercolor pigments directly onto the wet surface to create all the accidental details of the foliage.  The major challenge of this composition was to capture the beauty of the fall foliage without taking the focus away from the magnificent equestrian subjects.  The last item I painted was the hounds, and again, I hoped to give them just enough definition to distinguish them, without taking the focus away from the subject.

Finished my first “poured piece.” February 19, 2010

February 19, 2010

Jennifer in the Hunt

Glad to sign off on this one finally.  Thanks to all of you who have continually offered encouragement and affirmation.  I feel very satisfied with this.  The only finishing touches I added were myriads of branches and limbs in the foreground corners, along with dropped in colors to suggest sparse leaves and blossoms.  I’m happy with the way the alternating warm and cool colors created this sense of mood.  This is my first attempt at poured watercolor, and I’m already looking forward to my next try.  I think I’ve opened a new dynamic after years of pursuing the same trademark style.  We’ll see where it leads.

Thank you very much for reading.

Closing in on the Finish, February 18, 2010

February 18, 2010

Jennifer in the Hunt

This painting has had an incredibly long gestation period.  I can say that about my more successful watercolors, and hope I’ll be able to say it about this once it’s complete.  From my website (www.recollections54.com) there are a number of works that took months to complete, even years when the work would lay dormant for several months, untouched.  This is especially true of “Blues on the Corner.”

Jennifer Stewart is the one who created and maintains my website.  Two of her horses are in this composition, and her husband took the photograph (which incidentally has been published–thankfully, he has given me permission to paint from this published photograph).

Those of you who have followed my blog know that this is only about the fourth or fifth time I’ve painted a horse, and the first time ever that I have painted hounds.  All of this gave me pause, to say the least, and the reasons for this lengthy “gestation” process include anxieties, quitting, spending weeks and months staring at it, painting-stopping-staring-pondering, second-guessing, doubting  . . .  I think you know what I mean.  I could never have pushed this painting out quickly.  It contains too many firsts, and the more improvement I saw in the process of creating this, the more I hesitated to take the next step–you know, the paralysis that stems from the fear of blowing it.”  After all these years, it’s funny (or pathetic) to see how timid and tendentious I can be with watercolor.

So.  Today I went with my wife to Lyndon Acres in Burleson, Texas.  She stables her horse there, and was in the mood for a ride.  I set up my studio under the trees and poured watercolor all over the top two corners to enrich the dark greens of the foliage, being careful to apply plenty of masking fluid before the pouring.  After I got it home this evening, I peeled off all the masking fluid, picked up the brush, and restored the feathery foliage to the dark green areas.

My last step tonight, before posting this and heading to bed, was to pour deep plum colors all over the lower right corner (after applying plenty of masking fluid).  I have sprinkled heavy quantities of salt into the drying pigment, and I’ll find out in the morning how that worked out (I like what it did to the lower left corner lavender wash).

Anyway . . . thank you for reading, and I hope you’re getting as much fun out of this as I am.  I think I could be just a few days away from finishing it (if I don’t get interrupted.  Arrrgh!  The daily life cycle of a schoolteacher).

Bring on the Hounds, January 31, 2010

January 31, 2010

Bring on the Hounds

Well . . . this is the first time I’ve attempted to watercolor hounds, and I must say it’s giving me quite a challenge.  I spend more time staring at the photographs than painting.  The foreshortening is always a problem for me, but more than that, the trick of making predominantly white hounds emerge from a sunwashed dusty trail often leaves me scratching my head.  I am enjoying the challenge, and hope all will end well.  I have considerable time invested in this experiment, and it has plenty of firsts–my first attempt at pouring watercolor pigment onto the damp paper, my first attempt to paint equestrians, my first attempt at hounds–I guess this entire painting is a first attempt!

Jennifer in the Hunt, January 24, 2010

January 24, 2010

Jennifer in the Hunt

What a spectacular day to be outside for painting.  Lynda Lewis makes me feel welcome painting under the trees at Lyndon Acres in Burleson while my wife rides.  This painting I started before Christmas, but then got cold feet and let it lay dormant a few weeks (however, it continued to compost in my mind).  I’m completely out of my comfort zone here.  I’m pouring watercolors for the first time in my life, and painting with a limited palette of pure pigments instead of earth tones.  I have very limited experience in painting horses (about 4-5 watercolor sketches in my entire life) and have never painted hounds (which will eventually materialize in the foreground).  The colors are brighter than I am used to, but I’m enjoying the blaze before my eyes.  I’m spending much more time studying the photographs given to me by Jennifer Stewart (who created and maintains my website), beautiful photos taken by her husband.  I appreciate so much her contribution to this new adventure, and am looking forward to seeing where it will take me.  I still have a long way to go before I can get closure on this one, but at least I’m having fun.

My Studio under the Trees, January 18, 2010

January 18, 2010

Fox Hunt

I’m hesitant to post a work-in-progress, especially if the content is unrecognizable.  Nevertheless, I wish to keep the blog active by posting at least once a day.  And this present work finds me in unfamiliar waters.  It is a poured watercolor, the first one I have ever tried.  Almost no brushwork is present, as instead I have spritzed the paper with a spray water bottle after masking certain areas, and then have poured watercolors straight out of a bowl, then working with tissue paper, additional spritzes, and tilting the page around to move the pigments all over the page.

The subject is a fox hunt, though the viewer probably cannot make out the ghostly traces of several equestrians following a pack of hounds.  I think this work shows potential.

It was a beautiful day in Texas, with temperatures in the high 60’s and the sun bright all day.  I spent the afternoon at Lyndon Acres in Burleson, where my wife stables her horse and spent some quality time today riding.  I set up my
“studio under the trees” and had a fabulous time experimenting with this new technique (new for me, anyway).