Posts Tagged ‘Greek sculpture’

Letting the Muse Have Her Way

April 22, 2015
Sketch of

Sketch of “Crouching Aphrodite” from Kimbell Art Museum

What moves men of genius, or rather what inspires their work, is not new ideas, but their obsession with the idea that what has already been said is still not enough.

Eugene Delacroix

After a third consecutive difficult day at school, I decided at the close to take myself to the Kimbell Art Museum in neighboring Fort Worth. My birthday was Monday, and I could not even stop to think of it, thanks to the grading deadline. Tuesday featured another long day, capped with a 90-minute meeting, but two dear friends went out with me for dinner, drinks, and splendid conversation afterward–many thanks to you! Today, I decided it was time to celebrate my own birthday alone by visiting the art museum for all the right reasons–muses linger there and fuel the tired but willing imagination.

Birthday cards have been trickling in for days, all of them soulful. Today, having received yet another card in the mail, I paused in the Kimbell atrium, choosing to read it and think over its message for awhile. Then I entered my favorite gallery of antiquities, and there she was, waiting for me–my favorite sculpture from the Greco-Roman era: Crouching Aphrodite. I had my sketchbook in hand and attempted five renderings of her, choosing to post the final one above. I could not stop admiring this beautiful female form, chiseled and polished out of marble, and over 2,000 years old.

After an hour of perusing the permanent collection, I then strolled over to the neighboring Fort Worth Modern Art Museum to find a place out back to enjoy coffee and books.

I closed out the afternoon reading from my favorite birthday book: Paintings in Proust, writing my thoughts in the journal, and perusing two of my Robert Motherwell books. I couldn’t have dialed up a more perfect afternoon. The evening would bring on a crush of college grading and art history preps for tomorrow’s high school load, but the afternoon put the necessary wind in my sails to face the task.

Thanks for reading. It’s good to be back on the blog.

I paint in order to remember.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself that I am not alone.