Posts Tagged ‘poured watercolor’

Beginning of a Poured Watercolor of Sundance Square, Fort Worth, Texas

July 8, 2011

Sundance Square, Fort Worth, Texas

It’s taken awhile to get started on this large piece (22 x 28″).  I spent several hours yesterday, drawing out the composition.  This afternoon, in the bloody hot garage (another triple-digit Texas temperature day) I poured my first layers of color onto the tree foliage (Aureolin and Winsor Blue).  It took a few hours to dry.  Now I have poured my second, darker layer (a combination of Sap Green and Cobalt Blue Deep), sprinkled plenty of salt, and then intermittently hit it with a spray mist bottle of water and added more salt.  I’m afraid that is all I can do tonight.  it is nearing 11:00 p.m., and I should probably give this all night to set up and dry before I strip away all the masking fluid underneath.  I can’t wait to see how the beginning stages look tomorrow.  the setting is Haltom Jeweler’s at Sundance Square in downtown Fort Worth.  I spent two days there this past week, photographing, sketching and trying to make a decision on what to paint next.  I knew I wanted to tackle a full size sheet of watercolor paper again.  It’s been a few months since I’ve poured watercolor onto the page.  I’ve missed that sense of dizzying freedom.  I’m glad the Muse is stirring tonight.

Thanks for reading.

Large Framed Watercolors for the One-Man Show

May 15, 2011

Weatherford Victorian in the frame

Here is my second large full-size watercolor that I picked up framed today.  The Weiler House Gallery did the magnificent framing, and will host my One-Man Show in September.  For additional work at the Weiler House, please see http://www.weilerhousefineart.com.

Thanks for reading.

Back from Eureka Springs, Arkansas, June 14, 2010

June 14, 2010

In the Stream

I have finally returned from a one-week plein air watercolor class I taught at the Eureka Springs School of the Arts in Arkansas.  The experience was fabulous for me–seven adult students very enthused about studying watercolor and applying techniques en plein air. I think that I actually learned from the experience more than they did–I honestly found them that inquisitive and stimulating.  They have inspired me to work even harder in exploring this enterprise.

What I have posted is an attempt at poured watercolor.  Those of you who have followed my blog will recognize the subject matter–I painted this before, only smaller (this one measures 12 x 16″).  I am the fly fisherman, and the setting is Beavers Bend, near Broken Bow, Oklahoma.  I’m working from a photograph my wife took while we were there in summer 2009.  On the first day of waterc0lor class in Eureka Springs, we were greeted with rain, so we chose to work inside the studio.  During the afternoon hours I began pouring the upper half of this painting to demonstrate pouring techniques to the students.  On Friday it rained again, so we stayed inside on that day as well.  It was then that I decided to make the lower half a fly fishing composition.

This painting is still in progress. There are plenty of rough edges to file away.  Hopefully I’ll get back to it this week–I have plenty of other tasks that have managed to stack themselves around me and my studio.  Tomorrow I hope to get back outside for some more plein air activity, although Texas is nearing triple digits daily and isn’t too pleasant for outside tasks.

Let the Madness Begin!!! May 27, 2010

May 27, 2010

Plein Air Watercolor of 1950 Chevy Sedan Delivery

Tomorrow begins the “madness.”  I’m going to join the company of Captain Ahab in search of the white whale, or Dean Moriarty in search of kicks, or Jack Kerouac On the Road, or Claude Monet chasing the fleeting light, or Paul Cezanne seeking a solid form beneath the changing colors.  Tomorrow begins an eight-day plein air extravaganza in historic Waxahachie, Texas.  Tomorrow afternoon I will set up and paint somewhere near the courthouse.  On Saturday morning I will participate in the Quick Draw inauguration (90 minutes to produce a painting that is then auctioned on the courthouse square).  Following the eight-day event, I’ll set up a booth for the Historic Mansfield Art Festival.  Two days later, I’ll begin teaching a one-week plein air watercolor class at the Eureka Springs School of Art in northern Arkansas.

To all my readers–I’m sorry the school schedule buried me once again.  But I assure you, I will be posting daily throughout this plein-air event that begins tomorrow.  As to the picture posted, I’m not sure when I’ll return to it in the studio.  I’m glad watercolor doesn’t have a shelf life.

Thanks for reading.

Pouring Inside the Studio, May 9, 2010

May 9, 2010

1950 Chevy Sedan Delivery, poured watercolor

Normally, my watercolors are 8 x 10″ or 9 x 12″ since I like to carry D’Arches watercolor blocks around with me in the field.  However this one I’m working on in the studio, and it’s 24 x 18″ which is huge for me.  I’m getting lost inside the composition, which I guess is a good thing.  I feel no rush to complete it, and am really enjoying the process of pouring the pigment onto wet paper, tilting it around, and creating various effects and textures.  Sometimes I feel like a mad scientist in his laboratory.  I’ve done plenty of work with X-acto knife, toothbrush, masking fluid, paper towels, squirt bottle, salt and other various tools that I usually don’t carry around in the field.

Fox Hunt now on the Greeting Card, March 7, 2010

March 7, 2010

Jennifer in the Hunt

Signed-and-numbered limited edition giclees are being made from this image.  I’m hoping they will be ready in time for Thursday’s Art Festival in Hillsboro.  I’ve just finished preparing the 5 x 7″ greeting card, blank inside, with the following caption on back:  Here is my first attempt at painting a fox hunt with hounds.  Jennifer Stewart (the artist who designs my website) submitted to me a magnificent photo made by her husband Bart.  This painting is also my first “poured” painting, where I poured the watercolor pigments directly onto the wet surface to create all the accidental details of the foliage.  The major challenge of this composition was to capture the beauty of the fall foliage without taking the focus away from the magnificent equestrian subjects.  The last item I painted was the hounds, and again, I hoped to give them just enough definition to distinguish them, without taking the focus away from the subject.

Bring on the Hounds, January 31, 2010

January 31, 2010

Bring on the Hounds

Well . . . this is the first time I’ve attempted to watercolor hounds, and I must say it’s giving me quite a challenge.  I spend more time staring at the photographs than painting.  The foreshortening is always a problem for me, but more than that, the trick of making predominantly white hounds emerge from a sunwashed dusty trail often leaves me scratching my head.  I am enjoying the challenge, and hope all will end well.  I have considerable time invested in this experiment, and it has plenty of firsts–my first attempt at pouring watercolor pigment onto the damp paper, my first attempt to paint equestrians, my first attempt at hounds–I guess this entire painting is a first attempt!