Posts Tagged ‘Randy Brodnax and Friends Christmas Art Show’

Church Among the Artists

December 8, 2019

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The artist is the origin of the work. The work is the origin of the artist. Neither is without the other. Nevertheless, neither is the sole support of the other. In themselves and in their interrelations artist and work are each of them by virtue of a third thing which is prior to both, namely that which also gives artist and work of art their names–art.

Martin Heidegger, “The Origin of the Work of Art”

Sunday mornings at the Randy Brodnax & Friends Christmas Show always generates a warm vibe when we gather for “Church in the Bar.” The gathering is not irreverent as some would think the title suggests. I can think of nothing lovelier than gathering with kindred creative spirits for a moment of giving thanks and listening to meaningful music and testimony. Last year, Don Gallia got my attention as he played harp alongside a pair of guitar pickers. The diffused light filtering through the frosted bar windows cast a warm light over his form as he leaned into his harmonica and blew out the most soulful tunes. I sketched and photographed him repeatedly last year as well as this year, and am certain that I’ll attempt some watercolor sketches of him when things settle down a bit.

The Heidegger passage cited above first soaked into my consciousness in 2015 during the week I spent on the Laguna Madre island as Artist-in-Residence for Texas A&M University Corpus Christi. During the week on the island, the Heidegger essay became an important part of my artistic core, and this morning the words revisited me as I watched Don play and attempted to sketch his form. During this festival I’ve had some time to draw in my sketchbook and record some key ideas as I plan my next move. I love the thought of art creating me and me creating works of art. The relationship of the three is amazing–art is the primal force that creates me and the work. I keep turning the three over and over in my thinking. As an artist, I create the work, and the work creates the artist in me. Prior to both of us is this primal force we call Art.

We are about to begin our final day of the art festival and will be open till 5:00.

Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to discover.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.Shultz on website

Randy Brodnax & Friends Christmas Show Pleasures

December 7, 2019

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My Art Booth in the Bowling Alley of Sons of Herman Hall

Pleasures abound this Saturday morning in the Sons of Hermann Hall in the Deep Ellum  district of Dallas, Texas. The weather outside is gorgeous and the friends have been streaming through my booth all morning. I wish I could visit with them for weeks! Some of them I haven’t seen in a year.

The conversations have already filled my imagination with new ideas for painting, so, as soon as I get out of here, I should return to making art. I want to say Thank You to all of you who have been so encouraging during this 2019 run. I’m happy that my new website, davidtrippart.com, is already getting attention and patrons are reaching out to me. Soon, I’ll have the online store set up so anyone can buy online instead of trying to contact me by phone or email.

If you have time to come out and see me, I’ll be here Saturday till 6:00 and Sunday 10-5:00. We are located at 3414 Elm Street, Dallas, TX 75226-1720.

Until next time then, thanks always for reading.

I make art in order to discover. 

Shultz reduced

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.

 

Relaxing Before the Christmas Festival

December 6, 2019

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Last Year’s Randy Brodnax & Friends Christmas Show

. . . success in your art depends almost entirely on your own industry; but the industry which I principally recommended, is not the industry of the hands, but of the mind.  As our art is not a divine gift, so neither is it a mechanical trade.

Sir Joshua Reynolds, Discourse 7. December 10, 1776

Late tonight, I’m blessed with this delicious moment in my room at The Redlands Hotel to settle into bed and read while awaiting sleep. The day has been a full one, packing and organizing my gear at home, then driving two hours to Palestine to select work from my gallery for  this weekend’s Randy Brodnax and Friends Christmas Show at the Sons of Hermann Hall in Dallas. This will be my third year to participate in this venue, and I am looking forward with gladness to reuniting with the artistic spirits there.

http://www.randybrodnax.com/christmas_show.html

Tonight I am reading a thought-provoking address from Sir Joshua Reynolds, founder and first president of the Royal Academy of Arts. During my years of teaching Advanced Placement Art History I thoroughly enjoyed discussing his contributions with my students, but only now am I getting around to reading his actual writings and public addresses. As for myself, I was a late bloomer when it came to appreciating scholarly study, but I’m glad the itch finally came. I love making art, and I love learning as a student of letters and philosophy the fresh ideas that drove many of the creative spirits whom we revere today.

This will be my last festival for 2019, and I’m hoping for a good time. For any of you readers who are in the Dallas area, I hope you will take the time to come visit us. The Sons of Hermann Hall is an amazing venue for an art festival. I am blessed to be a part of this tradition. We will be open 5-9 Friday, 10-6 Saturday, and 10-5 Sunday.

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Thanks for reading, and I hope you will check out my new website:

davidtrippart.com

     Shultz reduced

I make art in order to discover. 

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.

Thoughts Amidst the Show

December 1, 2018

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My Booth on the Ground Floor (formerly a bowling alley!)

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Sons of Hermann Hall, 3414 Elm Street, Dallas

The crystal sphere of thought is as concentrical as the geological structure of the globe. As our soils and rocks lie in strata, concentric strata, so do all men’s thinkings run laterally, never vertically. Here comes by a great inquisitor with auger and plumb-line, and will bore an Artesian well through our conventions and theories, and pierce to the core of things. But as soon as he probes the crust, behold gimlet, plumb-line, and philosopher take a lateral direction in spite of all resistance, as if some strong wind took everything off its feet, and if you come month after month to see what progress our reformer has made,–not an inch has he pierced,–you still find him with new words in the old place, floating about in new parts of the same old vein or crust. The new book says, ‘I will give you the key to nature,’ and we expect to go like a thunderbolt to the centre. But the thunder is a surface phenomenon, makes a skin-deep cut, and so does the sage. The wedge turns out to be a rocket. Thus a man lasts but a very little while, for his monomania becomes insupportably tedious in a few months. It is so with every book and person: and yet–and yet–we do not take up a new book, or meet a new man without a pulse-beat of expectation. And this invincible hope of a more adequate interpreter is the sure prediction of his advent.

Ralph Waldo Emerson, “The Method of Nature”

Wow. Just wow! I had a few moments to read this morning before leaving for Dallas for the second day of our 40th annual Randy Brodnax and Friends Christmas Art Show at the Sons of Hermann Hall. Last night was such a special time, as this time of the year in this place always is. I feel that throughout this day, I’ll be thinking on these remarkable words of Emerson that have truly rocked my thought-world this morning.

Wish I had time to write more, but I have to dash. Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to discover.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.

 

Morning Coffee with Dave, Ezra Pound, and a Swirling Fog of Tasks

November 28, 2018

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Genius… is the capacity to see ten things where the ordinary man sees one.
Ezra Pound

Clouds of thoughts thicker than swarms of mosquitoes greeted my waking moments this morning. Having now showered, dressed, made coffee, finished breakfast and taken a seat at my favorite writing desk, I assumed the clouds would have dispersed, or at least thinned by now. Not to be. Two large queues of college work wait for grading, and my self-imposed deadline says “Get that done today” (I also sent a promised email to all students last evening). The Brodnax and Friends 40th Annual Christmas Show opens at the Sons of Hermann Hall in Dallas Friday evening and I have devoted this entire day to packaging my latest inventory. Tomorrow I load the Jeep and leave for my gallery in Palestine to gather the rest of my freight for a Friday morning load-in and set up. A stack of 100 stamped greeting cards lies at my elbow. A Mail Chimp invitation still needs to be composed and emailed out to the rest of my online friends who have registered for updates. I am three-quarters finished with reading  Hiking with Nietzsche and yesterday I picked up a copy of Herman Hesse’s Steppenwolf to read for the second time in about thirty years. No matter how busy my day, I force myself to read for awhile in the morning to get my mind “centered” somewhat. And there is still this Ezra Pound 5 x 7″ collage that I haven’t quite decided whether or not is finished or needs further attention.

So, if Ezra Pound’s quote above is to be taken seriously, then I am a genius. Since I have my last Logic class of the semester tomorrow morning, I supposed it is also appropriate to  begin thinking in terms of propositional logic and convert “If Ezra pound is accurate, then I am a genius” to symbolic form:

E ⸧ G

Now, having done that, I am going to finish my coffee, read awhile, then attack this fog of tasks that will not go away.

Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to discover.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.

 

Winter Time

December 5, 2017

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It is the sense of the sublime that we have to regard as the root of man’s creative activities in art, thought and noble living. Just as no flora has ever fully displayed the hidden vitality of the earth, so has no work of art ever brought to expression the depth of the unutterable, in the sight of which the souls of saints, poets and philosophers live. The attempt to convey what we see and cannot say is the everlasting theme of mankind’s unfinished symphony, a venture in which adequacy is never achieved. Only those who live on borrowed words believe in their gift of expression. A sensitive person knows that the intrinsic, the most essential, is never expressed.

Abraham Joshua Heschel, Man is Not Alone: A Philosophy of Religion

In 1978, while a seminary student, I was introduced to Heschel’s classic book, The Prophets, authored in 1962. I was taken with this scholar’s approach to the study of Hebrew prophecy, and never heard his name again until I was reading some book associated with art (don’t recall what!) and read his name associated with this book Man is Not Alone. On a lark, I purchased the work through Amazon, and have been amazed at its contents. I took the book with me to the Randy Brodnax and Friends Christmas Art Show last weekend, and continued reading it during slow moments between sales.

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My booth at the Randy Brodnax Show

Reading the book made me ache for a return to the studio, as I always do when I’m stuck in a booth for several days. I am never able to express what I feel when I am working on a piece of art, and am glad to read such words as those above. “Ineffable” is the best word for the experience of creating art. Currently I am working on this Christmas railroad theme and about to finish another steam locomotive under a snowy night sky, as snow flurries are already beginning outside my window as I write this.

Winter time is a season I always anticipate with gladness, not only because of Thanksgiving and Christmas but also because of the transitions. Friday I’ll give my last final exam at the college and enjoy a month hiatus from teaching. My American Railroad Odyssey show at The Gallery at Redlands in Palestine will close December 16, and I will be in the gallery Fri-Saturday the next two weekends. Currently I’m doing business with Art for Goodness Sake, a gallery in Lubbock, Texas that began carrying my work two months ago. Once I’m finished at the college this week, I’ll transition into this “winter time” season where I’ll be able to focus exclusively on making art and re-stocking my inventory in the galleries and shops that carry my work. There is a possibility of a show in January, and if that comes to fruition, I’ll announce it immediately.

I love this time of year! Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to discover.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.

 

 

The Circle of Creative Eros

November 30, 2017

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Began the Day with Breakfast at Cracker Barrel before a Fire

It was a free society, to be sure, but one without depth: its ceaseless expansion, whether into outer space or on the production line, had created an almost irresistible temptation on the part of everyone to produce in order to produce still more. Tillich exhorted the producers of cultural goods to stop moving in this one dimensional direction–to come to a halt in order to “enter creation and unite with its power,” in short, to add the vertical line of depth to the horizontal line of extension.

Wilhelm & Marion Pauck, Paul Tillich: His Life & Thought

On May 6, 1963, theologian Paul Tillich spoke at the fortieth anniversary party for Time magazine at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City. His audience consisted of the 284 celebrities selected for Time cover stories. His historic speech was titled: “The Ambiguity of Perfection”. In this speech, he addressed a crowd of movers and shakers of his day with the jolting words I’ve posted above. Tillich was fond of addressing the tension of the horizontal dimension of production with the vertical one of creative eros.

For the past couple of decades I have mused over this horizontal and vertical dynamic that Tillich expounded, and have known too well the tensions between what I face today (production deadlines) and what I enjoy on other days (feeding on ideas and creating art from the inspiration). For the next four days I will continue what I’ve known all this week–gathering, organizing, packing and loading art furniture and inventory–the horizontal. When the dust clears Monday, I hope to return to the studio and resume the creative task–the vertical.

Tillich’s tension between the horizontal and the vertical, the production energy vs. the intellectual process has held my attention over the years, but as I look at my own life processes, I tend to see them moving in a circle, a circle of creative eros. I hope it is O.K. now to share my circle with you.

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I perceive the foundation of my lifestyle as one laid in my study. I read every chance I can get, and have been scribbling my ideas from my reading in journals since 1985. I love the history of ideas–art, literature, philosophy, religion–and cannot find enough hours in the day to pursue this interest. For three decades, these readings have spawned classroom lectures and discussions, and now in my semi-retirement days, I still have this satisfying outlet in a university classroom.

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My expression from reading and thinking finds a good outlet in the classroom forum, but that is not enough. I also have to create visually, and from the study I generally find my way into the studio. And as I work, the “smart TV” continually plays YouTube documentaries and lectures from the world of ideas–art, literature, philosophy and religion–and I listen with a glad heart while I paint.

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My ideas have a way of dispersing in the classroom as they disappear into the air and hopefully take root in students’ lives. However, the art works on paper have a way of accumulating into boxes and cartons, and need a place to go. Hence the days when I have to load up and deliver them to a gallery, store or art festival.

So, today and for the rest of the week, my circle will be anchored in this third realm. All day today I will be printing, packaging and organizing my inventory. Tonight I will load the Jeep and tomorrow morning at 9:00 arrive at my Dallas destination to set up for the Randy Brodnax and Friends Christmas Art Show. I enjoy all three parts of this circle that has its way of organizing creative eros. And I’m anticipating good things today as I work.

Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to discover.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself that I am not alone.

Coherence Beneath the Scattering

November 29, 2017

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My Garage Experiment in Setting up the Booth for the Weekend

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I’m still making decisions on what paintings to hang in the show

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For the first time in months, I have all my greeting cards in one show

All of his activities were part of an underlying continuity, the diverse elements of which were brought together and reconciled by his own deep understanding of the unity that underlay the complex fabric of images, words, things, and sensations that constituted his world.

Jack Flam, Robert Motherwell Paintings and Collages: A Catalogue Raisonne, 1941-1991, volume 1

When I get caught up in a maelstrom of details such as I’ve endured the past few days, my mind goes either to Andy Warhol and his factory lifestyle of cranking out product or Robert Motherwell as he wandered from his painting studio to his graphics studio to his library. This evening I have felt closer to the Motherwell syndrome as I re-thought the final lecture I delivered this morning to my college classes and then spent the entire afternoon and evening moving between my garage with decisions about booth setup to the studio for printing, matting and sleeving prints and greeting cards. I also set aside some quiet time to sit in my study, read and reflect over the affairs going on lately. The day has indeed pulled me in multiple directions but I’ve loved it all, and I get to spend all of tomorrow doing the same. Showtime begins Friday!

Thanks for reading.