Posts Tagged ‘Show Me the Monet’

What Do Artists Do All Day?

January 26, 2021
Bright Sunlight Floods Studio Eidolons

“We all need white space–which is to have time when we aren’t doing, but being,” [Penny] Zinker said, citing activities like thinking, reading, being in nature and unplugging from electronics. “That doesn’t mean that it isn’t a bit structured–we can go to a yoga class or join a hiking group” she added. “It creates structure so that we create that white space.”

Meera Jagannathan, “Here’s how to make the most of your ‘executive time’ at work”, MarketWatch

While working in the studio this morning, I had the TV tuned into a series of You-Tube documentaries: What Do Artists Do All Day? As I listened to the interviews, I wondered about giving my own account. For quite awhile I have had this notion to share on the blog my day-to-day activity in Studio Eidolons.

My routine is quite regular. The dogs are never going to let me sleep past 7:00 a.m. After feeding them, I move on to my favorite morning task–grinding beans and French-pressing New Mexico Piñon coffee. Sandi and I enjoy quiet coffee time with snuggling dogs drifting back to sleep after getting their bellies full. Over coffee, I scratch out the first lines in my daily journal, musing over what to read to set the tone for the day.

Coffee time merges into executive time, or white space time. This always involves books, my real passion. During all the years I taught, the classes began at 7:35, so there wasn’t really quality white space for morning reading then. Now with retirement in full bloom, I have the delicious option of reading the entire day if I choose, and I frequently choose. Recently, I’ve completed my reading of The River Why and Goodbye to a River. Those books have already set the stage for my next project in watercoloring. Now I am re-reading Friedrich Schiller’s series of letters: On the Aesthetic Education of Man. During my senior years, I have this compulsion to articulate my own theory of aesthetics and why I draw and paint the way I do.

Usually by mid-morning, I lay the books and journal aside and enter Studio Eidolons, my beloved creative space, named after Walt Whitman’s poem Eidolons. In the morning, light floods the windows and drafting tables in a manner I find very inviting. For the past couple of weeks, I’ve been on a watercolor binge, featuring canyons and snowy evergreen trees. Today I have given to framing them all so I can get them into the gallery.

My First Sedona Watercolor, 11×14″ framed. $400

Two summers ago, we visited the North Rim of the Grand Canyon and the red rocks of Sedona. From the backyard of our rented dwelling, I looked out on this rock formation, and in the course of a single morning began twenty 8 x 10″ compositions. The one pictured above was the very first attempt. Sometime during this past year, I took it out of my stack of unfinished work and put the finishing touches on it.

Sedona Again. 11×14″ framed. $450

Same story with this one–removed from storage and completed, but not framed till this morning.

Sedona. Sold.

This painting I also completed in the past year, and I was preparing to frame it, but a dear friend from my past saw it on Instagram and purchased it. So it is gladly making its way now to its new home. Thanks, Chris!

My Sweet Studio Companion

Baby Paddington has turned out to be a loving and quiet friend in the studio. All he asks is to be near me while I work on my projects.

Snowy Evergreens. 11×14″ framed. $450
Snow Evergreens II. 11×14″ framed. $450
Snow Evergreens III. 11×14″ framed. $450
First Snowy Evergreens. Sold

A couple of weeks ago I began a series of experiments with snowy evergreens, and before I began the framing, a dear friend found one of them on Instagram and made the purchase. This one is now in his home. Thanks, Jeff! The other three paintings have been prepared for a class I’ll teach tomorrow (Wednesday, Jan. 27) at Show Me the Monet Gallery in Arlington. I am teaching Watercolor Wednesdays there, about three times a month currently. I have already booked three for February. Anyone interested in any of those three-hour sessions can find the appropriate information on my Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/davidtrippart

Reading, Writing and Decompression

After a full day of working on art in the studio, I love to decompress with further reading and reflection. As the sun approaches the horizon and the shadows lengthen, I love sitting at the drafting table and looking out across the neighborhood. Today has been another one of those sweet days.

Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to discover.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.

Ideas Surging during Class Preparations

November 17, 2020
Prepping for tomorrow’s watercolor class

The first principle announces that “spirit consonance” imbues a painting with “life’s movement.” This “spirit” is the Daoist qi, the breath that animates all creation, the energy that flows through all things. When a painting has qi, it will be alive with inner essence, not merely outward resemblance. Artists must cultivate their own spirit so that this universal energy flows through them and infuses their work.

Marilyn Stokstad, Art History

I seldom work on my art at night, but I have a watercolor class to teach tomorrow at Arlington’s Show Me the Monet gallery from 2-5:00. We’re going to render the historic stable that housed Royal Ford, a prize racehorse. The structure is on the campus of Arlington Baptist University, and Sandi and I strolled the place in the early evening a few weeks ago to take pictures of the subject.

photo of the Royal Ford stable, Arlington Baptist University
Sketchbook page

I opened a small sketchbook at the table tonight and worked out a quick drawing, using the Blackwing Matte pencil I’ve come to enjoy using while journaling (I feel a spiritual connection, knowing the pencil was used by Chuck Jones when he created Bugs Bunny, along with writers including Steinbeck and E. B. White as well as composers Aaron Copland and Leonard Bernstein).

As I sketched, the mere mechanics of drawing soon gave way to spiritual musings and I found my mind drifting back to ideas I had studied years ago involving the sixth-century Chinese thinker Xie-He and his Six Canons for Painting. The first principle involves “spirit consonance” and refers to the spirit that animates the work of art. This I find hard to describe in words. It reminds me of Dean Moriarty in Jack Kerouac’s On the Road when he tries to relay his experience of listening to a musician who had “it.”

“Now, man, that alto man last night had IT–he held it once he found it; I’ve never seen a guy who could hold so long.” I wanted to know what “IT” meant. “Ah well”–Dean laughed–“now you’re asking me impon-de-rables–ahem! Here’s a guy and everybody’s there, right? Up to him to put down what’s on everybody’s mind. He starts the first chorus, then lines up his ideas, people, yeah, yeah, but get it, and then he rises to his fate and has to blow equal to it. All of a sudden somewhere in the middle of the chorus he gets it–everybody looks up and knows; they listen; he picks it up and carries. Time stops. He’s filling empty space with the substance of our lives, confessions of his bellybottom strain, remembrance of ideas, rehashes of old blowing. He has to blow across bridges and come back and do it with such infinite feeling soul-exploratory for the tune of the moment that everybody knows it’s not the tune that counts but IT–” Dean could go no further; he was sweating telling about it.

All my life I have loved making art. And when I am not making it, I am thinking about it and always looking at the world for possibilities to draw or paint. But when I sit down to create a piece of art, I am always second guessing what exactly I am doing. I have been trained extensively in the mechanics, and I have practiced the mechanics. But I know that “art” is more than the mechanics. Much more.

I am nowhere near the musician that I am the artist. I love my Martin D-35 guitar, and love the way it sounds. I was first taught the guitar basics when I was in fifth grade. I know how to play the guitar. But I know that when I play, I am obsessed with the “correctness” of my playing. I understand the chords, the notes, the fingerpicking patterns. But I feel that I play with the sensitivity of a machine. I can listen to another play an instrument much inferior to my own Martin, and yet the sounds that emanate from the instrument can bring tears to my eyes. That musician has IT. I don’t.

Visual art I know much better. But when I am making art and watching what emerges from my pencil, or flows out from my brush, I feel that there are those times when the only thing occurring is the mechanics, the correctness of my techniques. But then there are those other moments . . . moments when the picture seems suddenly to take on a life of its own, seems to be painting itself, and I feel that I am a passive instrument in the hands of a superior spiritual force. In moments such as that, I draw or paint, feeling I could do no wrong. In moments such as that, I’m not aware if I am making art for a matter of minutes or engaged for hours. Time elides. And there is no sufficient way to describe that experience. It happens with me sometimes with the guitar, but very rarely. I feel that dynamic much more when drawing or painting.

As I re-read this, I feel somewhat embarrassed. I will probably have enough mental editors in place tomorrow that I won’t babble and scare my watercolor students. But I do hope that somehow I can instill in them that there is more to watercoloring than learning techniques. My wish for anyone who endeavors to make art is for him/her to know the ecstasy that comes from being seized with a dynamic that transcends technical methods.

Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to discover.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.

Odyssey Driven

September 5, 2020
Returning to Work on Homer’s Odyssey

Tell me, Muse of the man of many devices, driven far astray . .

Saturday in the Studio Eidolons finds me chasing multiple interests. We’ve decided to put together another road odyssey with the change in weather approaching. Sometimes I think we have that inborn compulsion of geese taking flight when weather warnings are in the air. After laying it aside for quite a few months, I’ve re-opened the Greek text of Homer’s Odyssey and am once again immersed in his epic.

Putting a Few Finishing Touches to the Bomber Lure

After only two days, I seem to be nearing completion of the Bomber lure. The background took much more time than rendering the actual subject itself.

I completed a quick watercolor sketch for the first time in a watercolor diary I purchased last week. I plan on taking this sketchbook on my journey soon to see how many pages I can fill as we travel.

5 x 7″ watercolor sketch

The Arlington Gallery that carries my work (Show Me the Monet) has decided to sponsor Watercolor Wednesday, offering 3-hour watercolor classes 2-5:00 every Wednesday. I am scheduled to teach on alternating weeks. I have posted my next two classes, September 16 and 30 on my professional Facebook page. Cost is $55 and classes are limited to six participants. If you are interested in signing up, phone (817) 468-5263. September 16 will focus on painting a railroad boxcar similar to the one above, and on the 30th we’ll paint a wooden trestle located here in Arlington, Texas.

September 16 subject
September 30 subject

The morning is nearly over and I have promised myself more quality time in Studio Eidolons. Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to discover.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.

Announcing the Next Watercolor Class in One Week

July 24, 2020

After this long corona virus induced hiatus, I returned happily yesterday to teach my first watercolor class this year. Time spent with eager watercolorists was so invigorating, that I’m really looking forward to another one next Thursday July 30 from 2-5:00. We will meet at the Show Me the Monet Gallery inside Gracie Lane’s in Arlington at 4720 S Cooper Street. Cost for the three-hour session is $55. Seating is limited, so it is highly recommended to phone (817) 468-5263 and secure a seat in advance.

We are going to pull out all the stops and experiment as we paint a wildflower composition. I’ll be sharing a number of techniques I discovered while painting as Artist-in-Residence on the Laguna Madre a number of years ago. After retrieving my journals recorded from those days and re-reading the joy of discovering new methods for painting wild settings, I knew this was the kind of session I wanted to do with willing participants.

If you live in the area, I hope you will join us. If registration overflows, I guarantee we will repeat this lesson as soon as possible. I anticipate that we will uncover some of the magic that inspired such greats as Andrew Wyeth and Albrecht Dürer as they experimented in dry brush, drawing, scraping, masquing and spattering techniques in watercolor.

Thanks for reading.

I make art in order to discover.

I journal when I feel alone.

I blog to remind myself I am not alone.