Posts Tagged ‘Vintage Cars’

Visions of Kerouac, November 15, 2010

November 15, 2010

Visions of Kerouac

After a long weekend of delivering my art to three separate events (competition, gallery opening, and 2-day festival), I feel rather “wasted” this Monday morning.  But school still beckons, I’m a teacher, and therefore I answer the bell.

While at the festival, I worked on a painting each day.  The one posted is what I began yesterday (Sunday) morning, and tinkered with throughout the day (patrons were very few and even further between).  This is a 1950 Chevy Sedan Delivery that I have visited several times, thanks to the gracious owner of the property that allows me to “trespass.”  It is parked in a field north of Highway 77 just east of Interstate 35W, north of Hillsboro, Texas.

Making the one-hour drive to and from the festival each day gave me plenty of time to muse as I listened to CDs of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, narrated by Matt Dillon.  Kerouac’s work always leaves me in a contented state of mind, especially when I’m staring through the windshield of my Jeep and driving through wide-open country.  I decided on that second day of the festival that I would return to this subject of the Chevy.

I feel “drawn in,” Proust-like, when I see a vintage car rusting in an open field somewhere (and they are getting harder to find these days).  Cars from the fifties remind me of long road trips with my parents.  Seated in the backseat, I could not read (carsickness), so I had to stare out the window at the American countryside scrolling across my window as it were a TV screen.  I had hoped when I was younger that I would grow up to be a man with the ability to capture these American scenes either through story-telling or artist illustration.  I still feel that compulsion.

I’m experimenting more and more with the Masquepen when I work with tree foliage, weeds, and automobile texturing.  And I’m also finding salt to be more and more fun with all the surprises it leaves behind during the drying stages of the wet-on-wet washes.

Thank you for reading.

1949 Plymouth, Waxahachie Plein Air, May 31, 2010

May 31, 2010

1949 Plymouth, Waxahachie, Texas

Another extremely hot and humid day in Waxhachie.  I started this one in the shade, and 2 hours, 45 minutes later, the shade was leaving me.  I never did feel cool air from 9:00-11:45 this morning.  Bummer.  This one was extremely experimental for me.  I painted this car before in my studio (with air conditioning).  It is titled “Waxahachie Blue” and appears on my website http://www.recollections54.com.  It sold immediately, and I have done reasonably well selling limited edition giclees and greeting cards of the image.

Today however, I decided I wanted to try and capture the car at this three-quarter angle, and I wanted to darken the art gallery behind it.  I spent about 25 minutes drawing just the car (I don’t draw automobiles very well, especially in three-quarter).  Then I had to plumb in the architecture behind it.  So finally, when I began to paint, I was already intolerably hot, and the wet-on-wet I worked into the background got completely out of hand in a hurry.  I went ahead and threw plenty of salt at it to see how the pigments would break up.  I also dropped water on the dry work to see how the backwash would work.  After I finished my second hour on the work, the car had all but disappeared into the building.  So, I sat it aside in the direct sunlight, waiting for it to dry out completely, then I worked very carefully and controllingly, trying to re-separate the car from the dark gallery behind it.  Once I got that done, I decided to sign off and go look for lunch.

The best thing that came of this frustrating experiment was the pleasure of meeting with Gaylord O’Con of the Southwestern Watercolor Society (I met him in McKinney at a paint-out several weeks ago) and learning of Quiller Watercolor pigments.  I’m really intrigued by what he told me and can’t wait to check these out.  Hopefully I’ll have opportunity to paint with Gaylord soon.  His work this week at the Paint Historic Waxahachie event has been extraordinary.

Let the Madness Begin!!! May 27, 2010

May 27, 2010

Plein Air Watercolor of 1950 Chevy Sedan Delivery

Tomorrow begins the “madness.”  I’m going to join the company of Captain Ahab in search of the white whale, or Dean Moriarty in search of kicks, or Jack Kerouac On the Road, or Claude Monet chasing the fleeting light, or Paul Cezanne seeking a solid form beneath the changing colors.  Tomorrow begins an eight-day plein air extravaganza in historic Waxahachie, Texas.  Tomorrow afternoon I will set up and paint somewhere near the courthouse.  On Saturday morning I will participate in the Quick Draw inauguration (90 minutes to produce a painting that is then auctioned on the courthouse square).  Following the eight-day event, I’ll set up a booth for the Historic Mansfield Art Festival.  Two days later, I’ll begin teaching a one-week plein air watercolor class at the Eureka Springs School of Art in northern Arkansas.

To all my readers–I’m sorry the school schedule buried me once again.  But I assure you, I will be posting daily throughout this plein-air event that begins tomorrow.  As to the picture posted, I’m not sure when I’ll return to it in the studio.  I’m glad watercolor doesn’t have a shelf life.

Thanks for reading.

Pouring it on a 1950 Chevy, May 5, 2010

May 5, 2010

1950 Chevy Sedan Delivery, Hillsboro, Texas

Finally, I’m getting this one underway.  I have done two small watercolor sketches of this 1950 Chevy Sedan Delivery that I found north of Hillsboro, Texas, alongside Highway 77.  The owner of the property has graciously allowed me to come on site and take a good look at it, and sketch it on site.

Tonight I began this 24 x 18″ poured watercolor of it.  I can’t wait to get up to my elbows in this composition.  Hopefully I can begin rendering the car tomorrow.  Right now it’s wet, puddly, sloppy, gooey–all of the above.  I used too much water in the mixtures of pigment, and it didn’t take long to turn the entire stretched paper surface into a lake!  I’m going to have to turn out the lights and just let this set up for the night.  Maybe after school tomorrow I can return to it.  I definitely have the itch.   But you know–school.  It’s been a lousy year, trying to find quality time to make art.  If not tomorrow, then perhaps the weekend.

Thanks for reading.